Guest Keynote
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Tom Griffiths

Tom Griffiths

Cognitive Scientist, Professor of Information Technology, Consciousness, and Culture

Tom Griffiths is the Henry R. Luce Professor of Information Technology, Consciousness, and Culture at Princeton University.

 

His research explores connections between human and machine learning, using ideas from statistics and artificial intelligence to understand how people solve the challenging computational problems they encounter in everyday life.

 

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Monday, 29 October, 2018 04:45 PM|Monday, 29 October, 2018 05:30 PM

Guest Keynote: Algorithms to Live By: The Computer Science of Human Decisions

Hear a dazzlingly interdisciplinary insight from cognitive scientist Tom Griffiths on how simple, precise algorithms used by computers can also untangle very human questions. Modern life is constrained by limited space and time, limits that give rise to a particular set of problems. What should we do, or leave undone, in a day or a lifetime? How much messiness should we accept? Tom will explain how to have better hunches and when to leave things to chance, how to deal with overwhelming choices and how best to connect with others.

About the Speaker

Tom Griffiths is the Henry R. Luce Professor of Information Technology, Consciousness, and Culture at Princeton University.

 

His research explores connections between human and machine learning, using ideas from statistics and artificial intelligence to understand how people solve the challenging computational problems they encounter in everyday life.

 

Tom completed his PhD in Psychology at Stanford University in 2005, and taught at Brown University before moving to Berkeley and now Princeton. His research has received awards from a variety of scientific organizations, and has resulted in over 300 scientific papers.

 

In 2016, Tom and his friend and collaborator Brian Christian published “Algorithms to live by”, introducing ideas from computer science and cognitive science to a general audience and illustrating how they can be applied to human decision-making. The book was named as one of the Amazon.com “Best Science Books of 2016,” the Forbes “Must-read brain books of 2016,” and the MIT Technology Review “Best books of 2016.”

Hear it first at Symposium/ITxpo.