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Do you trust the data & reports from the big analysts?

Do you trust the data & reports from the big analysts?

Top Comment: With a grain of salt. A tablespoon if sponsored by a vendor.. View poll results (2830 responses)

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2830 responses
19 upvotes
Yes30%
No20%
Sometimes50%
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Anonymous Author
With a grain of salt. A tablespoon if sponsored by a vendor.
11 upvotes
Anonymous Author
The key is to get to know the analysts and then you can follow them. Just because something is from Gartner doesn’t mean it is the absolute truth. There are Gartner analysts that are brilliant, and others that are just ok. So it is a matter of seeing who wrote it, not that it is from a big analyst firm.
7 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Trust but verify applies here. Some reports are great and some analysts take a neutral view and do good evaluations. Other times it feels like reading paid promotional content, so doing your own due diligence on product and services and talking to un-biased peers is best backup to being fed a bunch of sales data/analytics.
5 upvotes
Anonymous Author
The key is to know who the author of the report is. Know their expertise, their biases, etc., and then you can know the value of the specific report. And certain analyst firms are closer to pay to play, so beware of those.
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Trust but verify if you can, compare with other data - definitely take the info with a grain of salt.
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Generally. But the big ones are also speaking from a general point of view, so the data and reports are directional. It’s important to speak to the analysts or engage them in a more meaningful way to set your own strategic vision. Most of the firms also offer conferences to meet peers digging into the same space.
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
You have to be careful in the context the data and reports are being presented. The data and reports often tell a story, but be cautious from the viewpoint of how it is being presented.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
It really depends on the analyst. Some analysts are great, others not so great. Pete Lindstrom of IDC is one of the best.  IDC has some of the best analytics around.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Don't think the word should be "trust". The data and numbers we assume are legit. The conclusions are likely biased. Rather the question is how often do you use the reports? Think most of us use them to further our own agenda and so pick and choose that is convenient.  We borrow their credibility to push our own.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
I always look at how many people were surveyed. Sometimes the numbers are surprisingly small. I also consider whether their profile is similar to my target audience. Otherwise, less relevant.
0 upvotes
Anonymous Author
You really need to know the analyst who is writing the report. Some analysts are awesome and brilliant. My friend Pete Lindstrom at IDC comes to mind. Others are ok. And others are clueless. So the key to the report is the author.
0 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Depends on the context of the report. Unless it's a very specialized report, you cross-reference with other reports from competitor market research agencies
0 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Depends on the business/technology area and if the same has been corroborated by other analysts.  While working in the past in Service Provider companies, I have been approached by analyst houses with consulting offers with guaranteed outcome of being featured in their Top-X vendor list.  So, my confidence with these reports are average and I use these to base my own research and analysis rather than using them for a final decision 
0 upvotes
Anonymous Author
You need to know the analyst and decide. Some analysts are amazing and you can take their word as accurate. Other have a more superficial understanding of things. When it comes to technologies and vendors, the analysts often speak to CxOs, but will never speak to a developer or system administrator. That is a significant gap.   https://medium.com/p/feb2cc0b5edf
0 upvotes