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Do you feel your IT understands what are organizational top priorities are? And how do you ensure you meet those goals?

Every year I perform a Business Impact Analysis (BIA). The process requires each and every business area to provide the most critical functions of what they do, which is usually 3-5. They also provide details of how they get the work for those 3-5 (email, calls, other business areas...), what they use to process the work (Word, Internet, Github,....) who relies on their work (Finance, Operations...) who relies on them (Sales, Engineering....) and any applicable regulations and timelines. Once I have that info, I correlate the data to identify the top 5-10 critical functions for the business. I then map all of the data related to those Critical Functions to identify the tools and resources that support them. Lastly I share the findings with the Steering Committee (made up of Execs from each department) and we discuss the finer points until the list is accurate and properly ranked. This is then used to help drive our business, our disaster recovery, project prioritization and staffing. Its not the only methodology or tool used but provides a nice piece of the puzzle.

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Anonymous Author
Every year I perform a Business Impact Analysis (BIA). The process requires each and every business area to provide the most critical functions of what they do, which is usually 3-5. They also provide details of how they get the work for those 3-5 (email, calls, other business areas...), what they use to process the work (Word, Internet, Github,....) who relies on their work (Finance, Operations...) who relies on them (Sales, Engineering....) and any applicable regulations and timelines. Once I have that info, I correlate the data to identify the top 5-10 critical functions for the business. I then map all of the data related to those Critical Functions to identify the tools and resources that support them. Lastly I share the findings with the Steering Committee (made up of Execs from each department) and we discuss the finer points until the list is accurate and properly ranked. This is then used to help drive our business, our disaster recovery, project prioritization and staffing. Its not the only methodology or tool used but provides a nice piece of the puzzle.
4 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Without that IT cannot survives Alignment between IT and Bus is very essential and has several areas as per Loftman model: 1) skills 2) Measures (definition of success) 3) Architecture 4) Governance 5)partnership
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
A study was done back in 2007 on how much organizations feel their IT is aligned with them and how effective their IT were. You might find the study interesting. And yes, as the title suggest, “alignment” is not always the key. And sometimes, misaligning yourself will be the better move. Full disclosure: I’ve fell for this trap as well in my previous organization. It was only after I left that company that I stumbled upon this article and suddenly, things were making sense to me. https://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/avoiding-the-alignment-trap-in-it/
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Absolutely!  If IT is not on the same page as the business that would be a big issue!! The way we meet the goals is by ensuring we meet with the business to go over priorities so everyone is aligned on the same projects and goals.
0 upvotes