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What are your go-to interview questions?

The first question is: “What was the most exciting project you worked on in your last role, or which one are you most proud of? It doesn't have to be on your resume." And the other key question asks them to describe a scenario in which they had to think outside the box to resolve a problem. The best answer I’ve ever heard was from an engineer who worked on some ROM-based, code-based and OEM pieces. He said he couldn't diagnose where the problem was in a particular device, but he kept hearing this rhythmic click. He ended up putting his ear to the device while he was doing certain interactions to figure out the cause. Eventually he reconstructed it and had to go back to the manufacturer, who then realized that they actually had an issue. In the end he was able to help the vendor resolve an issue that they couldn't resolve themselves. And that’s what I mean by thinking outside the box. Even the fact that he remembered that story was critical, as unique as it sounds. That's the level I want to reach when interviewing candidates. They probably have the top three out of five skills that I need, but I want to know about how else they work. If somebody asks me, “Have you ever created an automated underwater basket-weaving system,” I’ll say, "No, I haven't. But I have created this other automated system, which might correlate with this project." That ability to translate between two very different experiences and make those connections is probably most important to me when I'm upscaling and rescaling.

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The first question is: “What was the most exciting project you worked on in your last role, or which one are you most proud of? It doesn't have to be on your resume." And the other key question asks them to describe a scenario in which they had to think outside the box to resolve a problem. The best answer I’ve ever heard was from an engineer who worked on some ROM-based, code-based and OEM pieces. He said he couldn't diagnose where the problem was in a particular device, but he kept hearing this rhythmic click. He ended up putting his ear to the device while he was doing certain interactions to figure out the cause. Eventually he reconstructed it and had to go back to the manufacturer, who then realized that they actually had an issue. In the end he was able to help the vendor resolve an issue that they couldn't resolve themselves. And that’s what I mean by thinking outside the box. Even the fact that he remembered that story was critical, as unique as it sounds. That's the level I want to reach when interviewing candidates. They probably have the top three out of five skills that I need, but I want to know about how else they work. If somebody asks me, “Have you ever created an automated underwater basket-weaving system,” I’ll say, "No, I haven't. But I have created this other automated system, which might correlate with this project." That ability to translate between two very different experiences and make those connections is probably most important to me when I'm upscaling and rescaling.
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