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Have you seen examples of wearable technology intended for personal safety or emergencies?

Amongst all the wearable tech devices that are out there, why isn't there something that protects us? Women in particular would have a use for that. Years ago, I brought an idea I had to Disney, which was a way to track children who wander away from their school playground. There are a lot of issues that people have with their children being snatched, so I wondered why there was nothing you could add to their garment that would allow them to be tracked. 20 years later, we're looking at thread in our clothing that can be electrified. Digital clothing is starting to appear in the market, but none of it is protecting you. There should be something in my coat that I can touch to let people know I need emergency assistance. That is the kind of technology for good that we should be looking towards. We should be trying to find ways to bring that out into the market that will not scare people. With emergent and exponential technologies in particular — AI coming together with blockchain, wearables and other kinds of technology like 5G capability and even 6G — what direction will those things take? If you were using all of this emerging or exponential technology, how would you throw that into a startup in some way that created value based on a bad situation?

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Anonymous Author
Amongst all the wearable tech devices that are out there, why isn't there something that protects us? Women in particular would have a use for that. Years ago, I brought an idea I had to Disney, which was a way to track children who wander away from their school playground. There are a lot of issues that people have with their children being snatched, so I wondered why there was nothing you could add to their garment that would allow them to be tracked. 20 years later, we're looking at thread in our clothing that can be electrified. Digital clothing is starting to appear in the market, but none of it is protecting you. There should be something in my coat that I can touch to let people know I need emergency assistance. That is the kind of technology for good that we should be looking towards. We should be trying to find ways to bring that out into the market that will not scare people. With emergent and exponential technologies in particular — AI coming together with blockchain, wearables and other kinds of technology like 5G capability and even 6G — what direction will those things take? If you were using all of this emerging or exponential technology, how would you throw that into a startup in some way that created value based on a bad situation?
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Anonymous Author
Yes . Wearable connected thru mobile apps providing alerts to care partners 
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Anonymous Author
Yes, the Apple Watch with fall detection! 
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Anonymous Author
There are some wearable tech products intended for safety. During a women's launch at Reinvent, before the pandemic, they gave us all a ring that could track your whereabouts and let people know that you were in trouble. And that's not the only device like that. It is a space that's being explored and funded, if not widely adopted. But the question is, why doesn't your Fitbit have that capability? One of the issues is that people don’t view that kind of technology as something that protects them; they’re more focused on the potential for it to be misused against them. There's two sides to that story, but many people are already struggling with how much data the world is collecting on us.
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Anonymous Author
There are always constraints around tracking technology. The SPCA in New Zealand was a recent client and they have an enforcement arm to prosecute and seize animals that have been mistreated. They go into the wilderness and to farms, and in some cases they go onto land where people are hostile and have weapons. They're trying to figure out how to track their enforcers to provide them with health, safety and security. But the problem is that most of our technology is centered around a cellphone network, so that wireless network disappears once you get out to certain areas. That's where the constraint is. You have to start building algorithms to estimate how long each call will take. If we estimate that you'll come back into service at about 3:45 p.m., and you haven't come back into service by 4:00 p.m., then we will escalate that. You need to build a lot of context awareness into it as well, which gets quite tricky, but it's a problem that can be solved if someone had the appetite for it.
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Anonymous Author
I have not seen firsthand the use of wearable technology intended for personal safety; however, I have seen the news of a lady who was alerted (by the heart rate app on her Apple iWatch) that her heart rate was too low (it was below 40 BPM for over 10 minutes)…while I cannot recall the actual diagnosis, after extensive testing at the hospital, the end result was that she had a pacemaker installed.
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Anonymous Author
We have deployed smart helmets with air sensors for construction workers. They are able to detect *limited* hazard and could use alerts
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Anonymous Author
Have used wearables that notified us if people came within 5-6 feet.  Useful for social distancing but also a bit annoying.  
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Anonymous Author
I've read about some personal safety devices such as bracelets, necklaces, and rings that look normal but can notify emergency contacts regarding your location upon activation via Bluetooth connectivity to a mobile device. Some of them can also start audio recording upon activation. Also. if the device accidentally activates, it can be deactivated using a mobile phone. Although these wearables currently can't prevent attacks from occurring, it appears that they can do a good job at alerting family and friends about compromising situations. I currently wear an Oura ring (which monitors activity, heart rate, sleep, etc.) and, while it’s not designed to send out emergency alerts, it is linked to my mobile phone, and you could imagine a similar device sending alerts based on health conditions.
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Anonymous Author
I believe healthcare and medical is number one industry to benefit from wearable technology. We all know fitbits and smartwatches are pretty common and humans are using them to keep track of health data and monitoring at personal level. But I recently learned that you can communicate your health data with your physician electronically using these devices. With 5G availability, healthcare wearable devices are going to be a huge success and breakthrough for remote diagnostics etc.!
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Anonymous Author
Yes. However, there are still a lot of privacy and security questions on whether the benefits will outweigh the potential for misuse and danger. 
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Anonymous Author
A startup presented to an Angel Network (of which I am a member), a device that monitors irregular heartbeat - with 98% accuracy and 10% the size of the regular Holter monitor used by hospitals for patient monitoring over 24-72 hours.  This device could run without recharge for a week and transmit data via Bluetooth to the mobile into an app which would analyze using standard protocol and an expert AI to send diagnostics to a panel of Doctors or the designated personal medical professional. An extremely useful device to proliferate accurate diagnostics in ischemia patients. 
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Anonymous Author
There aren't many, however I have seen example of Apple smartwatches that can detect when you fall.
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Anonymous Author
Yes in mines and chemical plants all the time. Been around for decades
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Anonymous Author
-Some of the features of Apple Watch as well as using a chip/microprocessor to detect whereabouts are providing personal safety. - A lot more can be done but then it becomes a privacy issue . Security and privacy at times are two sides of the same coin.
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Anonymous Author
I’ve seen watches used to monitor a person’s health primarily for the elderly and people with chronic health issues
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Anonymous Author
Our organization currently deployed a form of a wearable duress button for our executives/VIPs. Before procuring, we did extensive research of available options. One of the key findings was that this technology is still quite expensive for mass market adoption, if one is looking for reliable communication and true portability. For now, the best option for the mass mass market is still a special app in the phone or smartwatch.  
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Anonymous Author
Not with that sole intention. I have come across numerous fitness wearables and some with health, particularly heart, related functions. Other than life alert... 
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Anonymous Author
Yes, IOT enabled watches to collect health data and alerting doctor even before the need for hospitalization. Life can be saved if alerts can be raised before the incidence. 
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Anonymous Author
Yes, in healthcare it is a new trend to allow the use of Apple watch for fall detection and/or monitoring of various heart conditions. Granted the fall detection is more important for personal safety, there are still use cases in which the heart detection can be utilized in order to share data with your primary care physician.
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Anonymous Author
For monotoring Health parameters such as ECG, BP, Pulse, Oxygen etc
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Anonymous Author
Wearable technology is used in many ways for personal safety and for emergencies to help people. For example, people used wearable technology to track and receive notifications of their heart rate and blood pressure. The data can be transmitted to their healthcare provider via the cloud. It is a technology that will become more widely use to help save lives and other emergency situations.
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Anonymous Author
I've seen an read about successful smartwatches and heartrate monitoring devices. The one that I haven't heard much about is wearable kids shirts and patches to track your children. I'm sure that will make the news once there's a successful use case.
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Anonymous Author
Yes, for example, firefighters have advanced technology to locate them in a fire where it is dark and very smoky.
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Anonymous Author
Wearable tech especially smart (health) watches and/or bands with capability of alerting when key vitals go up or down. Apple watch’s fall detection, automatic alerting, AFib scanning, Geolocation by family using Find My. Some very powerful and useful features in terms of heath, safety and tracking during emergencies.
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Anonymous Author
A colleague is currently trialling a wearable device in their manufacturing plant which gives real time feedback to the worker. The feedback is based on if they are using poor lifting techniques, intense movements and the number of repetitive back movements per hour in order to reduce the amount of workplace injuries. 
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Anonymous Author
Yes, during the pandemic we reviewed some great tech that ensured people stayed 2 meters away from each other. 
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Anonymous Author
There are huge opportunities and many application areas like smart helmet , smart vest for construction workers and those who are working in hazardous industries. Similarly, for front line workers, pilots of trains and buses , smart wearables not only is useful for health monitoring but also for protection of passengers.
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Anonymous Author
Wearable technology intended for personal safety and emergencies. Wearables provide data based on sensors here still data accuracy is the concern. SPO2 monitoring or Head beat or Blood pressure monitoring via smart watch is rarely said to be accurate. Still, this helped many in COVID-19 , where SPO2 monitoring was one of the major attribute in medical assistance.  Good Infrastructure support is required for the analysis of alerts generated from wearables, but still most of the wearables are restricted provide data upload via mobile apps. Data privacy and data encryption is also as most of the mobile apps developed are not gone for proper application security testing. 
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Anonymous Author
Yes, we have done one imitative in construction site , We have used helmet for our labors with  Beacon IoT  stickers  it serve not only to control the labor's attendance, measure the performance in the right zone but also the helmet buzz in case of hazard or double buzz for gathering in the assembly zone 
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Anonymous Author
I have just started looking for senior safety devices and am not very impressed at the moment. There needs to be a balance between the information obtained and the safety/emergency systems connected to and the wearability and usefulness. I am starting to realise that wearing a specialised device can cause the individual to realities their frailty and could speed up the process. Admitting one is getting old and in need of support is a hard road to travel for some. For my particular requirements, I may well be looking for a multi-purpose device that has safety systems as an addition as opposed to a special device. 
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Anonymous Author
I believe the original wearable technology was the old "I've fallen and I can't get up" device.  
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Anonymous Author
Motorbike inflatable crash vests come to mind. Still currently unwieldy, expensive, and require charging between rides but have the potentially enormous benefit if it prevents serious injury or death.
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Anonymous Author
Yes there are many, one such example would be the apple watch with fall detection!! 
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Anonymous Author
We are using wearables as end point notification units to announce about security threats in our solutions that serve for security monitoring. The notifications are delivered to mobile apps and forwarded to wearbles too. Notifications on weapon, fight, smoke and fire and other threats are shown together iwth additional crucual info. Check it out at scylla.ai
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Anonymous Author
Yes and fews years ago we had to find a way to control in and out for people in healthcare center and we had little strap wearable on them et and nurse could be alerted if the cross the perimeter of the bullying for their safety. 
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Anonymous Author
Many of the smartwatches available today already monitor for cardiac events and provide “quick” access to dial 911 from a paired cellular device. I have not seen many good examples of a standalone device designed just for safety or security.
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Anonymous Author
Yes - Apple Watch has some features that fall in this category.  
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Anonymous Author
Apple Watch has some features for this and is not to be underestimated. Simple, effective and fairly priced. The falling sensor and the high heart rate detection are great practical examples. 
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Anonymous Author
I have not used any of the supposed wrist technology meant for safety, but I know there are some wearable technologies that monitor heart rate, pulse, blood pressure, etc. But I think more needs to be done.
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Anonymous Author
Artificial intelligent in car, will lock automatic when emergency situation
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Anonymous Author
I have seen many examples of wearable technology intended for personal safety or emergencies, i.e.: Body-mounted sensors Fitness trackers Smart watches and pins Wristbands Augmented reality (AR) headsets etc.
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Anonymous Author
My parents use Apple Watch to contact emergency services in the event they fall down unexpectedly and are not alert enough to tell Siri they are okay.
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Anonymous Author
There are a myriad of options out there for personal safety, many of them smartphone applications.  Recall that smartphones and smart watches include some basic personal safety functionality, such as the SOS call function on iPhone and Apple Watch devices. There are also standalone wearable devices out there that work with smart devices, such as the Flare bracelet, which works with iPhone and can trigger an SOS call in a "duress" mode, as well as fake an incoming phone call to help one evade an annoying, if not dangerous, person.  Flare can also send your present location to someone you trust (on-demand tracking).  ADT has a line of similar smart jewelry called InvisaWear, which features Android device integration. There are a lot of options out there, this Wired article may prove useful for further review: https://www.wired.com/story/best-personal-safety-tech/
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Anonymous Author
We may know many more than we think. Many mobile apps to locate us, send SOS, locate childrens, etc. Smartwatch Apps to measure pulses and similar things. Apps for the car to detect accidents, necklaces apps for old people, etc.
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Anonymous Author
I have recently seem two very interesting wearable technologies or body augmentation technologist to increase both security and capabilities in industrial or warehouse settings. nOne if the use of exoskeleton to increase strength when lifting weight. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLWuHo63C8k&;ab_channel=CNET The second one is what's called a third arm/hand. That's attached to the shoulder or the back of the operator and can be managed via a neurallink or via BMI to be used as third arm.
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Anonymous Author
Not really, at least not in widespread usage
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Anonymous Author
There are plenty of these devices, though some may not strictly fall into the wearable category. Apple Watch is probably the most ubiquitous along with AirTags which can most definitely be used for safety.  Garmin's inreach devices are often worn (carabinered to) hikers in remote areas should there be an issue.  Some of our clients have and are developing tech in aged care for falls etc. Versions of this have been around for years, but are improving constantly.
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Anonymous Author
Yes, especially for women, babies and the elderly
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