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How do you deal with your Manager who does micromanagement to you as part of his/her personality? Regardless of the seniority you have?

You either have to accept the micromanagement or move on, really not much choice. In the interim, I would have a conversation with your manager about your concerns to see if there’s any common ground, perhaps to enlighten your manager that’s what that individual is doing, or find some things that you could do differently/better/otherwise that would change the behavior.

Anonymous Author
You either have to accept the micromanagement or move on, really not much choice. In the interim, I would have a conversation with your manager about your concerns to see if there’s any common ground, perhaps to enlighten your manager that’s what that individual is doing, or find some things that you could do differently/better/otherwise that would change the behavior.
3 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Have an open and continuous conversation that you want more autonomy and empowerment. Propose regular briefings/meetings where you can fill him in on all the details and developments or weekly emails with detailed progress so he can fill in control and informed. Then you can work on extending the time intervals of the briefings/reports so they don’t happen as often. Depending on how you manage the projects/tasks internally, you can propose to use a tool like Asana where your manager can specified detailed tasks with notes and timelines and will know where you are in the progress
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
The need for micromanagement stems from inability to delegate. The are anxieties and trust issues at the roots of it. It's a personal psychological trait formed many yeas ago in a result of some traumatic experience. No talk will ever help here. I am sorry to say, but you have to adapt or quit. Hoping a person like that will change is a sort of wishful thinking.
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Fix a regular update interval based on how detailed the manager wants the information Ask the manager to route all queries from others to you first and only handle escalations. Micromanagers normally entertain queries from everyone and then come and discuss the same with you. They should typically be handling only exceptions. This would take the pressure away from them and help you build trust. Be proactive in updating such managers on what is happening around them. They love to hear it from you and than others. Remember a micromanager gets uncomfortable even when nothing happens. For them silence is scary. So update them even when everything is going smooth. This one is a bit tricky , but do the same to your manager as well! Ask him/her questions often, especially in areas where they are not proficient or comfortable. This could work as they may then want to leave you alone.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
It's been mentioned already that options are limited - adapt or move on. Trying to have a frank dialog could help and lead to finding a compromise or establishing a common ground. I often try to remind people of nonmonetary motivations that include - autonomy, mastery, and purpose.     https://www.ted.com/talks/dan_pink_the_puzzle_of_motivation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc  
0 upvotes
Anonymous Author
My own manager isn’t a Micromanager, fortunately but I’ve had to work closely with one who insisted on approving/denying every request I had for their staff. I understood and agreed with their reasoning but this micromanage also overlapped with a consistent trend of being unresponsive to these requests, so I’d be following up on the same request for weeks/months, and things going unresolved for years.Ultimately it was never “dealt with” beyond me making sure I documented my communications to cite when the security issues I raised became a problem.
0 upvotes