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Is moving data storage from on-prem to public cloud always cost effective?

Not if you don’t review performance requirements. In my experience if left to engineers and architects without guidance they over provision which is more expensive. I would do the same if I was only accountable for performance It’s critical you tie performance and cost together with the decision process Initially we let engineers just size environments and they consumed the entire years budget by end of February. Key is to have mangers involved in provisioning that have both a technical background and understanding of budgeting and costs

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Anonymous Author
Not if you don’t review performance requirements. In my experience if left to engineers and architects without guidance they over provision which is more expensive. I would do the same if I was only accountable for performance It’s critical you tie performance and cost together with the decision process Initially we let engineers just size environments and they consumed the entire years budget by end of February. Key is to have mangers involved in provisioning that have both a technical background and understanding of budgeting and costs
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Anonymous Author
Only if appropriately designed and the right storage is used for the right data type. Likely you don't need all your data all the time, so it's important to put archival data on a different storage type than daily accessed data. Aside from how often you access the data, it's important how many transactions on the data you perform. If you are copying/moving the data periodically, it's important to have it within the same region for the egress cost. I've put terabytes of data into a storage account in the cloud and have chosen the cheaper type per GB, only to find that thousands of transactions are done on that data daily. The total monthly cost of all the transactions far exceeded the price per GB, so by switching it to a storage account that is more expensive per GB but cheaper per transaction, the overall cost significantly decreased. For example, recently, I have reduced our data cost for backups by 85% by moving it from one object storage vendor to another. It's all about what makes sense for what type of data. Don't restrict yourself to using one type of storage or one vendor; explore and do the math on what makes sense for your situation.
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Anonymous Author
Things to think about: scale, how much data ingress and egress, accessibility, security, and management. Once you evaluate all of those and cloud offerings to support your data, you should be able to make the call on whether or not it’s cost effective. For example if you have a ton of data ingress and egress, you might not want to store all of your data in S3 because it will be spendy.
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Anonymous Author
It has to be correctly planned and executed. It also depends how much data needs to be moved and the cost of real internal IT.
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Anonymous Author
The answer is always it depends. We found that it's very effective for use cases such as: - Long-term Archival storage. The cost-saving over offsite backup and operational costs are significant. This is especially if you are committing to a long-term pricing model. - Large-scale analytical data processing. This is close to, if not impossible to do so with an on-premise setup. Another tip I always keep in mind is that: Storage is cheap; it's actually the compute expense, and labour those are expensive.
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Anonymous Author
In general - yes it is. There is a chance that on-prem will be more efficient, but that's usually an edge case. Just considering DevOps cost to support and troubleshoot cloud is a preferable option. However, the appropriate cloud solution should be picked.
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Anonymous Author
As others have said “it depends.” The answer isn’t an unqualified yes or no, and while the cloud offers tremendous performance and scalability it can also easily see you blow out costs if not managed and designed well. You need to consider storage volume, what will access your storage and how often - are those apps in the same cloud and region as the data? How frequently will you access the data - does it all need to be “warm”? There are a lot of issues so the answer to your question is not a blanket one.
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Anonymous Author
its always cost-effective to put old data on data warehouse storage. This ensures its availability and recovery as well. The choice of data store is important though and will optimise its use thereafter in terms of cost and usage. 
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Anonymous Author
Whether cost effective or not depends on your environment.  Points to consider are a.  Are all the users located only in one place or distributed across the country / world ?  The cost of connectivity along with redundant connections will have to be also taken into account. b.  Is the data production critical ?  If there is cut in the connectivity to access the data will operations in your organisation stop ?  So the cost of stoppage of business operations will have to be considered c.  Are there any regulatory requirements to keep the data on premise or within the country ? d.  How sensitive is the data that any access by any other third party will have serious consequences ? e.  Extra security precautions that have to be taken when kept on cloud.  Those costs have to be also added
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Anonymous Author
It purely depends on the amount of data and the archival strategy applied. In the case of a small amount of data it probably isn't much beneficial, but if the size is large and you are willing to let go of immediate availability of data and put it to something like AWS Glacier, then yes there is definite cost-effectiveness applicable.
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Anonymous Author
In general, it tends to be cost effective, if we look at 360 deg. However if not done correctly can end up more expensive. There are a lot of factors that can come into play which might not pop up  or even visible when Data in on-prem. Foe ex:The amout of data that is transfered out of the network can be huge and impacts the cost. while this might be a non-issue. General recomendation would be to do a fair evalutation before doing this transformation.
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Anonymous Author
There's way too much to be considered for me to say it always is or never is.  As folks have mentioned, what kind of storage are we looking at in the cloud?  The cost of hosting on-prem can differ from organization to organization too.  I think, just like with anything, you evaluate all options based on your business and figure out the best option.
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Anonymous Author
Cloud can be cost-effective or expensive, It all depends on the requirements you have. There are multiple factors you need to keep in mind. There are calculators available on the web which you can use to identify what will cost. I would suggest you use those and fill in your requirements.
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Anonymous Author
Things that I feel should be taken care while taking decisions related to data storage: - Volume of transactional data being generated everyday - Archival policy as per the business needs  - Identification of read path and write paths basis the traffic in the systems and interdependencies -  Absolute volume of your data in your warehouses - Growth curve of the data in both transactional and warehousing systems - Privacy of data if is a major factor then the straight away answer is "on perm" Basis the above factors, you take calls  - The tools/tech stack that would be required to solve above problems - Time taken to build the on perm capability vs cost of it to the business - Cost effectiveness of having on prem vs cloud - Infra and operational cost for both the options
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Anonymous Author
Not always, but generally yes, if planned right. This depends on a lot of factors: 1. How are you storing your data locally. Are you using a Database, which one? Are you storing in a data warehouse? which one? 2. How are you planning to store the data in Cloud? 3. How much quantity of data do you need as "readily available" and what rest can be "archived" on less costly storage solutions (eg: AWS S3 Glacier, similar to Azure Blog Storage and GCP) In general, if you have an SME guiding you, and you plan right, and keep cost savings an equally important KPI in the metrics you track to mark the project as successful. PS: All major cloud providers will be very happy to provide you one free of cost, and even "fund" your migration activity and give you joining "credits" to make sure you become comfortable with their cloud offerings
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Anonymous Author
It all depends on how much data is there. For small firms with a limited amount and type of data, local storage is probably more effective and costs less. For large enterprise with a lot of xompelx data, it willd efintely save the cost. 
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Anonymous Author
It can be if you weight all factors properly and go with the proper provider and options that work for your use case.  When migrating to the cloud you have to consider data availability, transaction frequency, scalability, security, compliance, etc.  It is imperative that you understand how you intend to use the data you will be moving to the cloud so you can make the proper decisions that will be most cost effective for your scenario.
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Anonymous Author
One of the major benefits when switching from on-prem to cloud storage infrastructure is the relative ease with which data can be moved from rapid-access to longer-term storage. Especially when data has to be retained indefinitely for proof-of-purchase purposes there is no need to have the data online. It is fine for most use cases for there to be a delay in retrieval. We find that the cost of such storage can reduce the expenditure in that category by 90% or more. Additionally we find some (but not all) online storage providers very capable in cost-effectively moving large amounts of data from off-line to on-line and vice versa. What has surprised us on a number of occasions is the cost and time-delay in moving / uploading data from on-premise to the cloud: if that is part of your future plans, look at ways to physically ship drives instead of uploading data. 
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