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What strategies have you used to manage your project pipeline to ensure you see consistent value in your operations?

I am a retired CIO, but over the past several years I've been consulting across different sectors, and recently I've also taken board positions at two companies. I hired a new CIO to one of these companies—a hospital chain​​—and their primary role is to talk to users on a daily basis. Every week he meets with every CxO and visits at least one hospital to understand how technology is being used from the patient's perspective, the doctor and nurse's perspectives, etc. Most consultants would call that going back to design thinking in the way that you're involving various parts of the business. But the reason for this approach was that if you know the business, you can create a better solution. And this CIO had come from a manufacturing organization, he never worked in the hospital industry. But he was able to pick things up quickly, because within three months of visiting each and every user scenario, he had better dialogues with the business. It’s going so well that now we have the problem of plenty. We have so many projects in the pipeline and we have to keep pushing back to say, "Sorry, I only have that many IT people to run it." Even if I hire vendors to do it, I don't think we can manage all the changes. It’s a good place to be, but at the same time, I wish we could be faster, or better. I know we are not working at optimal speed. There's always room for improvement, so we keep on trying things. 

Anonymous Author
I am a retired CIO, but over the past several years I've been consulting across different sectors, and recently I've also taken board positions at two companies. I hired a new CIO to one of these companies—a hospital chain​​—and their primary role is to talk to users on a daily basis. Every week he meets with every CxO and visits at least one hospital to understand how technology is being used from the patient's perspective, the doctor and nurse's perspectives, etc. Most consultants would call that going back to design thinking in the way that you're involving various parts of the business. But the reason for this approach was that if you know the business, you can create a better solution. And this CIO had come from a manufacturing organization, he never worked in the hospital industry. But he was able to pick things up quickly, because within three months of visiting each and every user scenario, he had better dialogues with the business. It’s going so well that now we have the problem of plenty. We have so many projects in the pipeline and we have to keep pushing back to say, "Sorry, I only have that many IT people to run it." Even if I hire vendors to do it, I don't think we can manage all the changes. It’s a good place to be, but at the same time, I wish we could be faster, or better. I know we are not working at optimal speed. There's always room for improvement, so we keep on trying things. 
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