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What are you most looking for from vendors that pitch you?

I agree with Lee...Where does the product fit into my strategy. I tend to turn off when vendors start out with a slide deck telling me all their customers. I didn’t marry my wife for who she dated in the past.

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8 upvotes
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Anonymous Author
I agree with Lee...Where does the product fit into my strategy. I tend to turn off when vendors start out with a slide deck telling me all their customers. I didn’t marry my wife for who she dated in the past.
10 upvotes
Anonymous Author
I want to understand your how your product / service works techncialy, what is your company strategy and most importantly skip the marketing terms/hot topics. At the end of the day I want to know if you are a fit within my technology roadmap and how specifically that can work.
8 upvotes
Anonymous Author
I want the vendor to have done his homework on our organization so that they at least have a common understanding, 98% don't do this and it's a turn off at the get go. Those that do, I want to understand how their organization is going to help me achieve the goals of our organization. It's all about business outcomes, not selling me a widget or gadget. If you can truly partner in achieving those business outcomes, you'll be a vendor I'll use over and over.
5 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Here are my 2 cents on this topic...

1. What's their "story", "differentiator" or "value add" by the vendor to tell while trying to get the foot in the door
2. Reputation, financial stability and experience of the vendor
3. Reference cases and success stories in the same or comparable industry and their willingness to expose those references for direct conversations
4. Company structure, geographical representation, staff vs. contractor ratio, stability or fluctuation across employee base as well as management base...things like geographical spread may be more or less relevant depending on one's own structure
5. Experiences, qualifications, certifications (certifications matter more to some and less to others) of the vendor's staff / contractors
6. Certifications of the vendor organization and business (may be more or less relevant depending on the type of engagement and one's own business) like ISO27001, 9001, SOX or others
7. Compatibility in between the vendor organization and oneself (eg. values, style, human aspects, flexibility, customer focus...)
8. Last but not least of course - financial offering in comparison to competitors and in the context of one's own requirements
5 upvotes
Anonymous Author
I would say 1. Can highlight the pain points I may have based on industry knowledge if not the very specific knowledge of my company; 2. How their solution can be used to alleviate the problems (fit); 3. Why I should engage with them not a competitor; 4.The give and the get. 5.The talk to " ----" at -----. Direct referrals to customers.
4 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Too many spend way too much time with intro slides that are very general. If they have 30 minutes, spend no more than 5 minutes on that. They need to hit the ground running how they will solve the problem they claim to be able to do. More vendors need to read: 15 Minutes Including Q&A: A Plan to Save the World From Lousy Presentations   https://www.amazon.com/15-Minutes-Including-World-Presentations/dp/0978577620
4 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Real value propositions and use cases, as well as transparency around pricing. There is way too much marketing speak lately to even decipher what some of these products do, how they do it, and what value they bring. I have limited time so being direct and getting to the technical demo right away combined with these other elements is super helpful.
4 upvotes
Anonymous Author
I agree, I want to know about the company that stands behind the product and overall knowledge and stability for my roadmap, products and services. Is that salesperson start ing with me is going to be there or gone in a flash. tell me my life will improve with your support and what makes you stand above the rest, without marketing or disparaging the competition.
3 upvotes
Anonymous Author
I want for the vendor to first take an interest in where my organization is at and what my needs are with respect to where they at. Then tailor the pitch to hep me understand the value proposition and be ready for it to be in the future rather than today.
3 upvotes
Anonymous Author
A “to the point” value proposition without buzzwords.
3 upvotes
Anonymous Author
1. clear one page on the business problem you solve 2. clear evidence that you actually solved the problem for a client 3. no consultative sales please (who has the time for that?)
3 upvotes
Anonymous Author
A total package pitch thst not only sells me what I may already be interested in but shows me how they will continue to add value throughout the contract with information, reports ongoing continuous improvements so I am reminded why I made the right choice in them every quarter of the year. Ultimately if your vendors can contribute to help you look good, then they have potential.
3 upvotes
Anonymous Author
If they start with asking what my use case is, while I certainly expect the pitch to include how the solution meets this use case, it is also critical to be honest and cover how it *doesn’t* (or may not). yeah it may lose a sale but if I’m buying a product I want to know if I still end up with a gap I need covered by something else and if it’s worth the time to implement two solutions.
3 upvotes
Anonymous Author
The most important is whether they understand this is a potential partnership, not a contentious vendor/client relationship
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
I want to hear concrete examples of how their service will drive revenue for my specific product. Sometimes vendors pitch us with case studies from products/companies that are totally different from ours or try to woo everyone with buzzwords and pie-in-the-sky possibilities as to what can be achieved through their platform/service/product. I just want a tangible use case I.e. imagine we’ve already implemented your service- what is one way that I could use it tomorrow to drive business growth and what would you estimate the KPI impact to be? I also like to understand why it makes sense for my org to pay the vendor to provide the service rather than using internal resources to try to provide/build something similar.
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Understanding my business and not making one size fits all offers not being relevant for my business
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
To really understand the business needs. Not to try to sell me anything because they are “capable” in everything. I value honesty as well, if they tell me they can’t do something I value it the most. In the end, I’m going to found out about what they did to other customers, their boundaries and their full scope.
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Demonstrated and confirmed ability to execute and bring value. Too many talk a good game without the ability to deliver.
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
All of the above! Let’s get real though. I agree that vendors must do their research before pitching BUT vendors aren’t mind readers. I tend to ask lots of questions after the initial value prop pitch so what I would really like a vendor to do is to not just answer my questions really well, but to also dig in and really try to understand the problems I’m trying to solve. In a way I’m giving them an opportunity to demonstrate value that is most relevant to my org - and for that they have to break out of their script.
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Succinct use cases of their value proposition so that I understand all in costs to implement as well as benefits.
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
To understand my business needs and my IT challenges in order to offer a customized solution.
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
To work as a Partner and not as a vendor. One should understand my pain areas and try to resolve it effectively. Don't try to reinvent the wheel.
2 upvotes
Anonymous Author
I want to get why are the right person/organization for the job. What's their story and how its components signal value creation.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Their expertise and value they can offer (in terms of consultancy and content they have) in their industry... without being pushy to sell. I also rely on referrals (network word of mouth) for final go.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Agree with what’s here already. It’s about a business partnership and solving the problems I need solved for my business.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Relevance!
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Don’t ask for an hour Zoom meeting. Make it 30 minutes, and get straight to the point of what the product does. Most firms spend way too much time talking high-level and never get to technical details until they are almost out of time.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
It depends why I’m talking to them. Sometimes I am looking for how they see the problem space, maybe I want them to share with a community of practice, sometimes I’m pretty far along and looking for capabilities, occasionally I want to know if they want to partner or can be acquired. 🤣 In the end, I want vendors to listen & value the time and attention as much as I do. If I share about where we are at or specific opportunities, I don’t want a generic pitch. So for what works - humble brag questions that demonstrate how they think that are responsive to what we have shared about how we are approaching things is always brilliant.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
The current, the vision, the roadmap and the timeframe. Be clear and truthful.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
How you product or technology will solve the problems or shortcomings we have
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Speaking from a vendor's perspective, these are insightful answers! Not necessary something new, but the nuances around certain answers are very welcomed!
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Right mindset, willingness to execute the project, technical expertise, and approach, references and their client list.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
Are they looking to work for us or work with us? I prefer vendors to work with us. The whole reason a vendor is onboarded is to fill the gap, if they don't show the thought leadership, listen and work together, I would rather prefer hiring in-house.
0 upvotes
Anonymous Author
There are a few things that we look for when vendors pitch to us: 1. A clear understanding of our business and what we do - we want to know that you have done your research and understand our company and our needs. 2. A clear and concise pitch - we don't want to be bombarded with information, we want to know what you can do for us and why we should choose you over other vendors. 3. A competitive price - we want to know that you are offering a competitive price for the services or products you are pitching. 4. A knowledgeable and friendly salesperson - we want to be able to talk to you and get a feel for your knowledge and expertise, and we want to feel like you are someone we can trust.
0 upvotes