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Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP)

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP)
If you are a current SAP customer, when do you plan to migrate to SAP S/4HANA?

Top Answer: No plan to migrate soon.

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What should an IT leader do when the number of projects far exceeds their organization’s capacity?

Top Answer: Now that many CIO's are beginning to see COVID-related challenges disappear or fade away, we have the problem of plenty. Organizations want to catch up on all the time that they lost and all the business that they could not do. Many people, including myself, are now struggling with how to tell the business, "I don't have the capacity. Even if I want to hire people, it's not going to be easy to get the resources or the skills to execute what you want." It's been a very interesting situation, because the organization is willing to give us the budget but it's not about the money. The budget doesn't help me execute successfully, it only gets me started. Now every project is about building new capabilities, so I have to make sure the organization is internally aligned and able to absorb that change without disrupting business as usual, and then scale it from there. For most organizations, the digital transformations that started three or four years ago were put on the back burner because revenue had dried up. Suddenly they are back because revenues are back up again. We are seeing tremendous growth. But salaries have gone up dramatically, and I’m struggling to maintain even help desk support people.

How much time should your enterprise architecture (EA) team spend on operational tasks versus strategic planning?

Top Answer: It depends on the company size and what you're working on. Right now I have a very small direct team, so we try to have a balance. I spend more time on strategic stuff whereas I have one or two engineers who spend probably 50% of their time on tactical stuff. But the ideal split could be 60/40, or 70/30. But I think if you're trying to bring in change, some of your engineers might spend about 80% of their time on the ground building stuff. And over the years I've always done enterprise architecture as code, so that architecture is not too abstract.

How can major sustainability commitments from large corporations influence the wider industry?

Top Answer: Apple, Microsoft, and Amazon are all customers, and they all have sustainability goals they’re trying to accomplish. When they're doing their own initiatives, that gets all baked into what we do. How do we deliver? How do we package? What type of packaging material do we use? All that gets baked into our SBOM, so we kind of get pushed towards sustainable practices either way. For example, in terms of how we’re managing our freight, within the Europe region we are looking at electric cars or electric trucks. Obviously, that gets more traction in Europe than we've seen in the Americas or in Asia, etc.

What are your thoughts on SaaS management platforms (SMP)?

Top Answer:

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People & Leadership
Strategy & Architecture
Cloud
End-User Services & Collaboration
Process Management
Governance, Risk & Compliance
Data & Analytics
Business Intelligence
Security & GRC
Disruptive & Emerging Technologies
Team & Organizational Design
Talent Management & Performance
Culture & Values
Financial Management
Security Strategy & Roadmap
IT Strategy & Roadmap
Outsourcing & Managed Services
Network
Compute
Storage
Backup & Disaster Recovery
Public Cloud
Hybrid Cloud
Contact Center & Telecom
Data Center
Device Management
End-User Devices
Mobile
Productivity Tools
Collaboration Solutions
Document Management
Finance
Business Applications
Legal
Human Resources (HRIS)
Technical Product Management
Software Development
DevOps
Quality Assurance
Continuous Integration/Continuous Deployment (CI/CD)
Enterprise & IT Service Management (ITSM)
Availability & Capacity Management
KPIs, Metrics & Reporting
Vendor Management
Service Desk
Management Tools
Risk Management
Regulatory Compliance
Data Privacy
Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning (AI/ML)
Data Warehouse
Integrations
Data Lake
Threat & Vulnerability Management
Identity & Access Management (IAM)
Security Operations Center (SOC)
Augmented & Virtual Reality (AR/VR)
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Cryptocurrency & Bitcoin
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Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
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Why is the cost of feature implementation always higher at the enterprise level?

Top Answer: Cost is one of the major factors for any upgrade or new application adoption. At the enterprise level, the overall cost to implement a small feature is very high because to add that one extra feature or functionality requires several weeks or even months whereas in a startup, the same kind of changes can be done in hours or days. In a startup you have complete knowledge of what needs to be changed and the impact of that change because everything in the system is documented and complete ownership of the product lies within its organizations.  The loosely coupled architecture of startups is also a big advantage to change or integrate new applications. Enterprises generally never feel comfortable working with another startup, whereas startups easily collaborate with other startups. Startups are also very keen to keep their performance at it’s best and focus on new customers much more in comparison to large enterprise software builders or managed service providers. Another factor that increases costs in an enterprise is having to engage multiple vendors for changes, which mostly go through multiple large partners like OEM development partners, Microsoft Teams, etc.