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Talent Sourcing & Hiring
Which of these certifications is important to you when hiring a software tester? Choose all that apply.

Top Answer: When I was at E&Y, when the partner was asked if we had CISSP certification, he replied “no, but focus on their experience”.  After we all got certified, he started replying: “yes, but focus on their experience”.    The IT industry love certs. But what counts is experience.

IT Hiring Quarterly Survey: Q1, 2022IT Hiring Quarterly Survey: Q1, 2022

This survey will repeat quarterly, capturing trends in IT hiring through 2022. Benchmark your hiring experiences against your peers.

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Should all employers adopt a four-day workweek?

Top Answer: We must be thinking about how we get to a George Jetson work week.

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Does a startup’s success depend more on the idea or the team?

Top Answer: There are numerous books and articles on why startups fail. The failure rate is approximately 95%, and I have discovered that the most significant cause is not having the right team or being led by the wrong people. When this occurs, not everyone on the team is motivated by the same vision. If the idea is incorrect because you failed to understand the market, or had cash flow issues, etc., we can correct it with the help of the right team members. But it won't be easy to sustain the startup in the long run if the team is not correct. It is the team that ensures the mission's success. Every startup’s team needs to possess three key qualities: 1. Passion: If they're passionate about working in this startup, things will become easier. 2. Commitment: If they are not committed, then their passion will not have an impact. Anybody can say they’re passionate, but the commitment has to be there as well. 3. Adaptability: When people join a startup organization after working in an enterprise, they may not be able to adapt to the culture. For example, Infosys is now a billion dollar company, and among the top five Indian IT companies. It was started way back in 1981 by four or five passionate people. They’d been working in some IT company at the time, but they were all inspired by the same vision. They were passionate, committed and they were adaptable. That's how they built such a successful company. So the most important factor is the people, not the idea. People think of ideas all the time. If the team has these qualities, they'll think of many ideas to draw many investors.

What developments are you seeing in diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) practices?

Top Answer: I'm seeing a shift from DEI to IDE; inclusion is beginning to come first. It's a positive shift, because you can be as diverse as you want and still not be inclusive. It's kind of like neighborhoods in New York City: You can have a bunch of neighborhoods right next to each other, but you still don't feel like it's inclusive because everybody's confined to their own neighborhood. This shift to making inclusion a priority everywhere is refreshing.

What are some areas for improvement in diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) initiatives?

Top Answer: Inclusion is important but you also have to ask yourself: what are you doing to actually create the numbers? An emphasis on inclusion tends to mask the reality that we're just giving lip service to diversity concerns overall. Cybersecurity has been at about 10% to 11% female for the decades I've been in it. And for Black and Hispanic folks, both groups of which I'm a member, the collective total is 12% across the entire profession. Cybersecurity is an area in which we are facing shortages, and if we don't fix the diversity number, it's not going to get any better. Emphasizing inclusion is great if it truly isn't there, but I've often found it to be a way of obscuring the fact that the organization is not changing its hiring practices to improve diversity.

Hiring for Cybersecurity RolesHiring for Cybersecurity Roles

Headlines claim a cybersecurity talent shortage: What’s your experience? Benchmark against your peers.

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Has your organization tried retraining existing resources to join cybersecurity?

Top Answer: We’ve started a program for retraining some of the workforce on a volunteer basis. The program gives people an opportunity to look for a career inside the bank that they might not have been able to enter otherwise. I get a handful of bank employees and give them a crash course in cybersecurity. Then they come to work in my security operation center (SOC). It’s a career with good job security. I tell them, "As long as there's somebody in the company who likes to click on whatever they’re sent, you’ll have a job. Whether they’re opening an email, or clicking on a button to enter their password into some document, we have a job.” They all laugh at that, but it's true.

What non-tech backgrounds lay a good foundation for building IT skills?

Top Answer: I was looking through resumes when I had to hire a couple roles last fall, and I've interviewed probably a thousand people in the last 30 years. This one candidate came in after I had already decided on my senior ops role and when I looked at their resume, I put a hold on submitting that offer because I wanted to talk to this new person first. They were just as qualified technically, but one of their past experiences was being a professional magician for a few years. When I looked at their skills, I thought, "They can probably scale up a little bit here and we can refine this." I got on the phone with them and you could tell they were hungry. So I went back to HR and said, "Screw the previous offer. I want this person." I could tell from those oddities that they would bring in some different thinking; they were the biggest, uncut diamond that I could have ever found. It was probably the best hire I've had in many years. I knew they might not have picked up a lot of things, but they’ve just absorbed it and figured it out. So far, they’ve been like saving grace. If I find somebody like who’s a true oddball, I'll find a fit for them. But you have to put other constraints in place when you're looking for that and can't find it, which is where the hiring side of things kills me. I often talk about upscaling, rescaling and right-sizing, which involves moving people across different groups. I was trying to approach the marketing operations person for IT because they’re a professional writer who's written reams of documentation and policies — I really need that right now. I couldn't poach them from the marketing team, but I wish I could have.